Jump to Navigation

Contact Form

Bold labels are required.

Contact Information
disclaimer.

The use of the Internet or this form for communication with the firm or any individual member of the firm does not establish an attorney-client relationship. Confidential or time-sensitive information should not be sent through this form.

close

Office Location

Aventura Corporate Center
20801 Biscayne Boulevard
Suite 400
Miami, FL 33180

305-932-2293 Miami-Dade County
954-760-7077 Broward County

Subscribe to RSS Feed FindLaw Network

January 2012 Archives

Questions to ask for simple estate planning

Data shows that 55 percent of people in America die without having a will -- a very basic aspect of overall estate planning. Most times, these people do not have any sort of moral stance against creating a will, especially considering the benefits to having one. They either plan on creating one, but put it off until it is too late, or let the perceived complexity of estate planning intimidate them so they avoid it.

Digital estate planning can be daunting but important

As our culture turns to an increasingly digital society, estate administration is growing more and more complicated. More than ever, Florida residents are keeping important financial records online, whether stored on the hard drive of a personal computer or on Internet-based storage programs. This information could include bills that the person chose to pay online or statements for various financial accounts. Not accounting for these while executing an estate plan would be a gross oversight.

Living trusts protect assets for beneficiaries, not owners

A living trust can be a good way of protecting one's assets, but only under certain specific conditions. It is important to note that as long as the owner maintains power over the trust and benefits from it, the trust will be subjected to estate taxes. The owner's creditors can also attach the trust assets.

Broke and young? Estate planning is still smart

Many people throughout Florida, and the rest of the United States, need clarification on what an estate truly is. When many people hear the term estate planning, they think of a practice only tended to by the wealthy or elderly. After all, wealthy individuals have many assets to account for, while similarly, some elderly individuals have accumulated assets throughout the course of their lives.

Appreciated stocks: A tax-friendly gift for children

The holidays and upcoming end of the 2011 tax year are likely to get many Florida parents and grandparents thinking about appropriate gifts to give their children. These gifts do not always have to be toys or clothes. Parents can set their children on the right financial track by giving them things than can fit into their long term estate plans. Many grantors prefer this method over leaving money to their children or grandchildren until after they have died. This way they can enjoy watching their heirs benefit from their inheritance gifts while they are still living.